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Cinnaber Moth

PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 9:34 pm
by John Candlish
I have recently seen a few Cinnaber Moths at a couple of different locations near Rankinston, Ayrshire and I have found this to be quite strange since I can't recall ever seeing this species anywhere in this area in previous years. On 27/05 I saw my first individual near Littlemill Bing (NS4414) and during the following week I saw another one on two separate days within a few hundred yards of the original sighting, then today I saw another four individuals on an old grassy bing near Bow Hill (NS4412).

So I was just wondering how common is this species in Ayrshire and is it usual to find them flying during the daytime?

Re: Cinnaber Moth

PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2014 10:03 am
by nickcandlish
John,
I recorded Cinnabar twice last year on the 4th and 8th of June both at MV. I've lived here (NS411227) for about thirty years and they are the only two that I've ever seen. Although not in plague proportions ragwort is not uncommon locally and it surprises me never to have seen the unmistakable caterpillars.
According to the published records Cinnabar Moth north of the Lake District becomes largely coastal. Prehaps there is more of the FP along the uncultivated coastline.

Nick.

Re: Cinnaber Moth

PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2014 3:54 pm
by IainH
Like Nick says, although this species is widespread throughout England, it is mainly coastal in Scotland. This fact, coupled with the fact that it’s range is expanding northwards, makes me wonder whether the recent inland records you both report illustrate a northwards expansion of its tendency to occur inland.

Iain

Re: Cinnabar Moth

PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2014 8:22 pm
by nickcandlish
Ian,
Glad that you are still with us!
Seems to me that species/population density are in a constant state of flux comprising both additions and losses.
Off the top of my head local additions during my current trapping effort compared with ten years ago have been Pale Pinion, Slender Brindle, Buff Ermine, Cinnabar and Puss Moth. I'm sure there are other additions and probably also losses, however without conducting a detailed analysis of present and past records I can't be sure....the passage of years may increase wisdom but it sure doesn't help memory!
Simon Barnes wrote in The Times some months ago about the decline of Garden Tiger Moths and used it as a broad sweep example of a greater ecological malady. I felt that as a respected natural history columnist he let himself down badly by only presenting one side of of a complex situation,it almost made him sound like a politician!
This brings me neatly to a book that I'm reading at the moment 'WHERE DO CAMELS BELONG' I can't recommend it enough. Chatty style, blowing holes through our preconceptions of what belongs where in the world and why. Oh, and by the way I bought on the basis of a literary review by Simon Barnes!!

Nick.

Re: Cinnaber Moth

PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2014 7:22 pm
by IainH
Hi Nick,

Thanks for drawing attention to this book. I'd not heard of it, but it's one I intend to purchase soon.

Iain

Re: Cinnaber Moth

PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2014 6:18 pm
by John Candlish
Hi All

Thanks very much for all your info on the Cinnaber Moth and its distribution range, I shall defvinately be keeping an eye out for this species from now on.

John

Re: Cinnaber Moth

PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2014 9:37 pm
by AlistairMurdoch
Hi John and others,

the Cinnabar Moth was subject to a survey in Scotland in 2009-2011. Barry Prater has provided a report in Atropos issue 49 (summer 2013) pages 63-69. If you can track down a copy of this publication I am sure the report will prove an interesting read. Is anybody out there a subscriber to Atropos?

Alistair.

Re: Cinnaber Moth

PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2015 9:36 pm
by John Candlish
I saw my first Cinnaber Moth of the year yesterday (23/05/15) on an old grassy bing near Bow Hill, Rankinston, Ayrshire (Grid Reference NS4412).